Choosing an OAuth2.0 grant flow for your solution.

A colleague of mine that also specializes on Identity Management (IdM) with Identity Providers (IdP) such as AAD, Okta, ADFS, Ping Federate and IdentityServer, published this summary on the 6 different flows encompassed by the OAuth2.0 RFCs.

If you work with the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework and the OIDC Authentication Framework, you’ll find the article below very interesting.

One thing to remember when you study the Authorization Grants or Flows in OAuth2.0 is that neither the Extension Grant flow nor the Client Credentials flow require the end user to interact with a browser.

The Client Credentials Flow is designed for headless daemons/services where the is no human interaction. The Extension Grant Flow is sometimes named as OBO (on-Behalf-of) and can be used to exchange SAML2.0 tokens for OAuth2.0 access tokens/bearer tokens. This grant (Extension Grant) doesn’t necessarily require user interaction during the token exchange at the IdP for an authorized application if the token being exchanged is still valid. (OAuth2.0 Extension Grant) In this case the SAML2.0 bearer token with its assertions is exchanged for an access token/bearer token/JWT that represents the client application or service.

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